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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
April 30, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

According to the American Dental Association, periodontal disease is the most common reason behind tooth loss in American adults. This periodontal diseasemakes understanding why gum disease happens and how you can prevent it crucial to your oral health. Your dentist may suggest non-surgical periodontal therapy to reverse the effects of existing gum disease. Find out more about this important and powerful treatment option for your gum disease with Dr. Robert Morehead, Dr. Max Swenson, and Dr. Frank Cavaness at Anchorage Dental Arts in Anchorage, AK.

What is periodontal disease? 
Periodontal comes from the Greek word peri, meaning “around the tooth”, and odon, meaning “tooth”. The word periodontal itself refers to the oral tissues surrounding the tooth, called the gums. Periodontal disease affects the gums and occurs when bacteria grow under the gum tissues and causes them to become infected.

How can I prevent periodontal disease? 
Those patients who smoke, do not floss, have high levels of stress, take certain medications, have certain diseases, or who have poor nutrition are more at risk for gum disease than others. Preventing gum disease is easy with a strong at home oral care routine performed daily. This routine should consist of brushing twice daily and flossing between each tooth at least once. Flossing pulls bacteria and plaque from the spaces between the teeth, which are most susceptible to buildup since your toothbrush’s bristles do not reach them. Seeing your dentist for regular dental exams and cleanings every six months also works toward preventing gum disease as cleanings remove all of the plaque and bacteria under the gums and on the teeth.

Do I have periodontal disease? 
Periodontal disease can cause some obvious, tell-tale symptoms. One of the first signs of periodontal disease is bleeding gums while you floss. Though many people mistakenly believe that this symptom means that they should cease flossing, it actually means the opposite. Continued flossing will help reverse the bleeding and allow the infected gum tissues to heal. Some other signs of periodontal disease include swollen, red, or tender gums, unexplained bad breath, and gums which pull away from the teeth to form pockets.

Treating Periodontal Disease with Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy in Anchorage, AK
In most cases, your dentist can cure gum disease with a non-surgical periodontal cleaning. During this procedure, your dentist uses both specialized tools and hand scraping methods to remove all plaque and tartar deposits from your teeth. With the teeth clean and the root cause of the infection gone, your body’s natural healing methods can take over and reverse the uncomfortable symptoms.

For more information on non-surgical periodontal therapy, please contact Dr. Morehead, Dr. Swenson, and Dr. Cavaness at Anchorage Dental Arts in Anchorage, AK. Call (907) 276-1712 to schedule your appointment for a consultation with your dentist.

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
April 24, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
CharlizeTheronBackinActionAfterDentalSurgery

When they’re introducing a new movie, actors often take a moment to pay tribute to the people who helped make it happen — like, you know, their dentists. At least that’s what Charlize Theron did at the premiere of her new spy thriller, Atomic Blonde.

"I just want to take a quick moment to thank my dentists," she told a Los Angeles audience as they waited for the film to roll. "I don’t even know if they’re here, but I just want to say thank you."

Why did the starring actress/producer give a shout-out to her dental team? It seems she trained and fought so hard in the action sequences that she actually cracked two teeth!

“I had severe tooth pain, which I never had in my entire life,” Theron told an interviewer from Variety. At first, she thought it was a cavity — but later, she found out it was more serious: One tooth needed a root canal, and the other had to be extracted and replaced with a dental implant — but first, a bone grafting procedure was needed. “I had to put a donor bone in [the jaw] to heal,” she noted, “and then I had another surgery to put a metal screw in there.”

Although it might sound like the kind of treatment only an action hero would need, bone grafting is now a routine part of many dental implant procedures. The reason is that without a sufficient volume of good-quality bone, implant placement is difficult or impossible. That’s because the screw-like implant must be firmly joined with the jawbone, so it can support the replacement tooth.

Fortunately, dentists have a way to help your body build new bone: A relatively small amount of bone material can be placed in the missing tooth’s socket in a procedure called bone grafting. This may come from your own body or, more likely, it may be processed bone material from a laboratory. The donor material can be from a human, animal or synthetic source, but because of stringent processing techniques, the material is safe for human use. Once it is put in place your body takes over, using the grafted material as a scaffold on which to build new bone cells. If jawbone volume is insufficient for implants, it can often be restored to a viable point in a few months.

Better yet, when grafting material is placed in the tooth socket immediately after extraction, it can keep most of the bone loss from occurring in the first place, enabling an implant to be placed as soon as possible — even before the end of a movie’s shooting schedule.

Will Atomic Blonde prove to be an action-movie classic? Only time will tell. But one thing’s for sure: When Charlize Theron walks down the red carpet, she won’t have to worry about a gap in her smile.

If you have questions about bone grafting or dental implants, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Immediate Dental Implant.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
March 23, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root Canal  

Root canal therapy is a powerful tool in the fight against teeth decay. However, this procedure is often misunderstood. Luckily, your dentist root canalcan help you understand when you may need a root canal, what to expect during the procedure, and how it can benefit your smile. Find out more about root canals with Dr. Robert Morehead, Dr. Max Swenson and Dr. Frank Cavaness at Anchorage Dental Arts in Anchorage, AK.

Why is a root canal necessary?
A root canal is similar to a dental filling, a procedure which most people have undergone at least once in their lives. However, a filling repairs decay which has not yet reached the inside of the tooth to infect its inner tissues and nerves. For decay this severe, a root canal becomes necessary. The root canal removes the decayed inner tissues completely while a filling just removes the decayed portion of a tooth’s enamel.

Signs You May Need A Root Canal
It is common knowledge that a toothache is a sign that you have a decayed tooth which needs repairs. However, there are other, more subtle symptoms which could point to you needing a root canal. These include unexplained bad breath, a dark spot or hole in the tooth, sensitivity, especially to hot and cold, and pain while eating or drinking.

Root Canals in Anchorage, AK 
A root canal begins with a local anesthetic to numb the area of the tooth. This means that, though you may feel some pressure, there should be no pain or discomfort during your procedure.

For more information on root canals, please contact Dr. Robert Morehead, Dr. Max Swenson and Dr. Frank Cavaness at Anchorage Dental Arts in Anchorage, AK. Call (907) 276-1712 to schedule your appointment for an examination with your dentist today!

JulianneHoughSharesaVideo-andaSong-AfterWisdomTeethComeOut

Once upon a time, celebrities tried hard to maintain the appearance of red-carpet glamour at all times. That meant keeping the more mundane aspects of their lives out of the spotlight: things like shopping, walking the dog and having oral surgery, for example.

That was then. Today, you can find plenty of celebs posting pictures from the dentist on social media. Take Julianne Hough, for example: In 2011 and 2013, she tweeted from the dental office. Then, not long ago, she shared a video taken after her wisdom teeth were removed in December 2016. In it, the 28-year-old actress and dancer cracked jokes and sang a loopy rendition of a Christmas carol, her mouth filled with gauze. Clearly, she was feeling relaxed and comfortable!

Lots of us enjoy seeing the human side of celebrities. But as dentists, we’re also glad when posts such as these help demystify a procedure that could be scary for some people.

Like having a root canal, the thought of extracting wisdom teeth (also called third molars) makes some folks shudder. Yet this routine procedure is performed more often than any other type of oral surgery. Why? Because wisdom teeth, which usually begin to erupt (emerge from beneath the gums) around age 17-25, have the potential to cause serious problems in the mouth. When these molars lack enough space to fully erupt in their normal positions, they are said to be “impacted.”

One potential problem with impacted wisdom teeth is crowding. Many people don’t have enough space in the jaw to accommodate another set of molars; when their wisdom teeth come in, other teeth can be damaged. Impacted wisdom teeth may also have an increased potential to cause periodontal disease, bacterial infection, and other issues.

Not all wisdom teeth need to be removed; after a complete examination, including x-rays and/or other diagnostic imaging, a recommendation will be made based on each individual’s situation. It may involve continued monitoring of the situation, orthodontics or extraction.

Wisdom tooth extraction is usually done right in the office, often with a type of anesthesia called “conscious sedation.”  Here, the patient is able to breathe normally and respond to stimuli (such as verbal directions), but remains free from pain. For people who are especially apprehensive about dental procedures, anti-anxiety mediation may also be given. After the procedure, prescription or over-the-counter pain medication may be used for a few days. If you feel like singing a few bars, as Julianne did, it’s up to you.

If you would like more information about wisdom tooth extraction, please call our office to arrange a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Wisdom Teeth” and “Removing Wisdom Teeth.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
February 13, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dentures  
DenturesRequirePlanningandAttentiontoDetailtoLookNatural

Twenty-six percent of American adults between 65 and 74 have lost all their teeth to dental disease. This isn’t an appearance problem only—lack of teeth can also harm nutrition and physical well-being.

Fortunately, we have advanced restorative options that can effectively replace missing teeth. Of these, there’s a tried and true one that’s both affordable and effective: removable dentures.

Dentures are simple in design: a plastic or resin base, colored with a pinkish-red hue to resemble gums to which we attach prosthetic (false) teeth. But while the design concept isn’t complicated, the process for creating and fitting them can be quite involved: they must conform to an individual patient’s jaws and facial structure if they’re going to appear natural.

If you’re considering dentures, here’s some of what it will take to achieve a successful outcome.

Positioning the teeth. The position of the prosthetic teeth on the base greatly determines how natural they’ll appear and how well they’ll function. So, we’ll need to plan tooth placement beforehand based on your facial and jaw structures, as well as photos taken of you before tooth loss. We’ll also consider how large the teeth should be, how far to place them forward or back from the lips, and whether to include “imperfections” from your old look that you see as part of your appearance.

Simulating the gums. While the teeth are your smile’s stars, the gums are the supporting cast. It’s important that we create a denture base that attractively frames the teeth by determining how much of the gums show when you smile, or adding color and even textures to better resemble gum tissue. We can also add ridges behind the upper teeth to support speech.

Balancing the bite. Upper and lower dentures don’t operate in and of themselves—they must work cooperatively and efficiently with each other during eating or speaking. So while appearance matters, the bite’s bite adjustment or balance might matter more. That’s why we place a lot of attention into balancing and adjusting the bite after you receive your dentures to make sure you’re comfortable.

This is a detailed process that we may need to revisit from time to time to make sure your dentures’ fit remains tight and comfortable. Even so, modern advances in this traditional restoration continue to make them a solid choice for total tooth loss.

If you would like more information on denture restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Removable Dentures.”