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Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
February 08, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
DrTravisStorkIfOnlyIdWornAMouthguard

If we could go back in time, we all probably have a few things we wish we could change. Recently, Dr. Travis Stork, emergency room physician and host of the syndicated TV show The Doctors, shared one of his do-over dreams with Dear Doctor magazine: “If I [could have] gone back and told myself as a teenager what to do, I would have worn a mouthguard, not only to protect my teeth but also to help potentially reduce risk of concussion.”

What prompted this wish? The fact that as a teenage basketball player, Stork received an elbow to the mouth that caused his two front teeth to be knocked out of place. The teeth were put back in position, but they soon became darker and began to hurt. Eventually, both were successfully restored with dental crowns. Still, it was a painful (and costly) injury — and one that could have been avoided.

You might not realize it, but when it comes to dental injuries, basketball ranks among the riskier sports. Yet it’s far from the only one. In fact, according to the American Dental Association (ADA), there are some two dozen others — including baseball, hockey, surfing and bicycling — that carry a heightened risk of dental injury. Whenever you’re playing those sports, the ADA recommends you wear a high-quality mouth guard.

Mouthguards have come a long way since they were introduced as protective equipment for boxers in the early 1900’s. Today, three different types are widely available: stock “off-the-shelf” types that come in just a few sizes; mouth-formed “boil-and-bite” types that you adapt to the general contours of your mouth; and custom-made high-quality mouthguards that are made just for you at the dental office.

Of all three types, the dentist-made mouthguards are consistently found to be the most comfortable and best-fitting, and the ones that offer your teeth the greatest protection. What’s more, recent studies suggest that custom-fabricated mouthguards can provide an additional defense against concussion — in fact, they are twice as effective as the other types. That’s why you’ll see more and more professional athletes (and plenty of amateurs as well) sporting custom-made mouthguards at games and practices.

“I would have saved myself a lot of dental heartache if I had worn a mouthguard,” noted Dr. Stork. So take his advice: Wear a mouthguard whenever you play sports — unless you’d like to meet him (or one of his medical colleagues) in a professional capacity…

If you would like more information about mouthguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Athletic Mouthguards.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
January 11, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  

Learn more about cosmetic dentistry from your Anchorage dentists.

Thanks to a variety of innovative cosmetic dentistry procedures, it's never been easier to have the smile of your dreams. Dr. Robert cosmetic dentistryMorehead, Dr. Max Swenson and Dr. Frank Cavaness--your Anchorage, AK dentists at Alaska's Trusted Dental--share information on several common procedures.

Teeth whitening

Teeth whitening offers an effective way to brighten smiles dulled by the natural effects of aging or food and beverage stains. Professional-strength whitening agents penetrate your tooth enamel to remove stubborn stains. Unlike over-the-counter kits that can take weeks to lighten teeth, an in-office whitening session can whiten your teeth up to eight shades in just one hour.

Fillings

Fillings restore teeth damaged by cavities. Both silver amalgam and tooth-colored composite resin filling materials seal and strengthen your teeth.

Veneers

Veneers are thin porcelain shells that are bonded to the fronts of teeth. They're used to eliminate slight gaps between teeth and conceal imperfections and discolorations. They're also a good choice if you have a gummy smile and want to lengthen your teeth.

Crowns and bridges

Large fillings, root canal therapy and cracks can weaken teeth, making them more likely to break. Crowns slip over teeth, preventing breaks and adding stability. They're also used to lengthen short teeth, restore broken teeth and conceal imperfections and oddly shaped teeth. If you have a missing tooth, your dentist may recommend a bridge, a restoration made up of one or more artificial teeth anchored by two crowns.

Dental implants and dentures

Bridges aren't the only way to replace missing teeth. Both dental implants and dentures are excellent tooth replacement options. Dentures rest on your gums and are removable, while dental implants permanently replace tooth roots by bonding to the jawbone. A crown added to the top of an implant replaces the tooth above the gum line. Dental implants can replace a single missing tooth or all of your teeth.

Improve your smile with cosmetic dentistry treatments! Call Drs. Morehead, Swenson and Cavaness--your Anchorage, AK dentists at Alaska's Trusted Dental--to schedule an appointment.

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
January 01, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: pain management  
Non-PrescriptionPainMedicationcanManageMostPost-ProcedureDiscomfort

The old stereotype with the words “pain” and “dental work” in the same sentence is no more. Using local or general anesthesia (or a combination of both) we can completely eliminate the vast majority of discomfort during dental procedures.

But how do you manage pain in the days after a procedure while your mouth is healing? The news is good here as well — most discomfort after dental work can be easily managed with a family of medications known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In most cases, you won't even need prescription strength.

You're probably already familiar with aspirin, ibuprofen and similar pain relievers for the occasional headache or muscle pain. These types of drugs work by blocking prostaglandins, which are released by injured tissues and cause inflammation. By reducing the inflammation, you also relieve pain.

Most healthcare providers prefer NSAIDs over steroids or opiates (like morphine), and only prescribe the latter when absolutely necessary. Unlike opiates in particular, NSAIDs won't impair consciousness and they're not habit-forming. And as a milder pain reliever, they have less impact on the body overall.

That doesn't mean, however, you don't have to be careful with them. These drugs have a tendency to thin blood and reduce its clotting ability (low-dose aspirin, in fact, is often used as a mild blood thinner for cardiovascular patients). Their use can contribute to bleeding that's difficult to stop. Excessive use of ibuprofen can also damage the kidneys.

That's why it's necessary to control the dosage and avoid long-term use of NSAIDs, unless advised by a physician. Most adults shouldn't take more than 2,400 milligrams a day of a NSAID and only during the few days of recuperation. There's no need to overdo it: a single 400-milligram dose of ibuprofen is safe and sufficient to control moderate to severe post-procedural pain for about five hours.

Our aim is to help you manage any pain after a procedure with the least amount of pain reliever strength necessary. That will ensure you'll navigate the short discomfort period after dental work safely and effectively.

If you would like more information on pain management after dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Pain with Ibuprofen.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
November 17, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
AToothlessTiger

Let’s say you’re traveling to Italy to surprise your girlfriend, who is competing in an alpine ski race… and when you lower the scarf that’s covering your face, you reveal to the assembled paparazzi that one of your front teeth is missing. What will you do about this dental dilemma?

Sound far-fetched? It recently happened to one of the most recognized figures in sports — Tiger Woods. There’s still some uncertainty about exactly how this tooth was taken out: Was it a collision with a cameraman, as Woods’ agent reported… or did Woods already have some problems with the tooth, as others have speculated? We still don’t know for sure, but the big question is: What happens next?

Fortunately, contemporary dentistry offers several good solutions for the problem of missing teeth. Which one is best? It depends on each individual’s particular situation.

Let’s say that the visible part of the tooth (the crown) has been damaged by a dental trauma (such as a collision or a blow to the face), but the tooth still has healthy roots. In this case, it’s often possible to keep the roots and replace the tooth above the gum line with a crown restoration (also called a cap). Crowns are generally made to order in a dental lab, and are placed on a prepared tooth in a procedure that requires two office visits: one to prepare the tooth for restoration and to make a model of the mouth and the second to place the custom-manufactured crown and complete the restoration. However, in some cases, crowns can be made on special machinery right in the dental office, and placed during the same visit.

But what happens if the root isn’t viable — for example, if the tooth is deeply fractured, or completely knocked out and unable to be successfully re-implanted?

In that case, a dental implant is probably the best option for tooth replacement. An implant consists of a screw-like post of titanium metal that is inserted into the jawbone during a minor surgical procedure. Titanium has a unique property: It can fuse with living bone tissue, allowing it to act as a secure anchor for the replacement tooth system. The crown of the implant is similar to the one mentioned above, except that it’s made to attach to the titanium implant instead of the natural tooth.

Dental implants look, function and “feel” just like natural teeth — and with proper care, they can last a lifetime. Although they may be initially expensive, their quality and longevity makes them a good value over the long term. A less-costly alternative is traditional bridgework — but this method requires some dental work on the adjacent, healthy teeth; plus, it isn’t expected to last as long as an implant, and it may make the teeth more prone to problems down the road.

What will the acclaimed golfer do? No doubt Tiger’s dentist will help him make the right tooth-replacement decision.

If you have a gap in your grin — whatever the cause — contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation, and find out which tooth-replacement system is right for you. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implant Surgery” and “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
November 09, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures

An incomplete smile can take a toll on your appearance and self-esteem. Luckily, you can fill in your gaps and renew your teeth with dental implantsdental implants. But how do dental implants work and what can these unique and modern dental restorations do for you? Learn how dental implants can restore your smile with Alaska’s Trusted Dental in Anchorage, AK.

What can dental implants do for me? 
Depending on your situation, dental implants can help you replace only one, a few, or all of your teeth. Implants have three major methods, including single tooth replacement, multiple tooth replacement, or implant-supported dentures. Single tooth replacement uses one implant to fill in one gap. If you are missing multiple teeth in a row, multiple tooth replacement uses a dental bridge-like restoration with an implant on either side to replace your teeth. Implant-supported dentures replace all of your teeth using four or more implants throughout your upper or lower arch.

Caring For Your Dental Implants 
Dental implants are permanent and will last a lifetime with the proper care. However, failing to maintain your teeth and mouth properly can result in implant failure or rejection. Care for your implants as you would your natural teeth. Brushing twice daily and flossing at least once is only one part of the recommended oral care routine. See your dentist at least twice a year to keep up with your smile, repair problems as they appear and maintain your dental implants.

Dental Implants in Anchorage, AK 
Dental implants have three main parts: the fixture, the abutment, and the prosthetic. The prosthetic, made from porcelain, replaces your missing tooth above the gum line. Your dentist implants the fixture directly into your jawbone to replace your tooth’s root below the gum line. Finally, the abutment connects the fixture to the prosthetic to hold your implant together.

For more information on dental implants, please contact Dr. Max Swenson, Dr. Robert Morehead or Dr. G. Frank Cavaness at Alaska’s Trusted Dental at either location in Anchorage, AK. Call our Midtown Anchorage office at (907) 341-3740 and our South Anchorage office at (907) 349-3569 to schedule your appointment today!