Why It Is The Right Time to Quit Smoking

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
February 26, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Quit Smoking  

Why is it the right time to quit smoking? The answer is simple: one, smoking is bad for both overall and oral health, and two, there are now plenty of resources to help quit.

How smoking impacts oral health

We all know how smoking cigarettes ruins overall health by contributing to lung cancer, heart disease, stroke and chronic lung issuesSmile such as COPD. But, what does smoking do to the mouth--i.e, the teeth, gums, tongue and so on?

The American Academy of General Dentistry states that when men smoke for 10 years, they likely to lose an average of 2.9 teeth. When women smoke 10 years, they will probably lose 1.5 teeth. The fact is that smoking comprises every aspect of oral health including:

  • the body's immune system. With lowered immunity, an individual is more susceptible to infections and gum disease. A smoker heals less quickly after a dental procedure, too.
  • plaque and tartar. Studies show that these substances build up more quickly in a smoker's mouth. This means more frequent cleanings are necessary, and if plaque and tartar are not addressed, tooth decay, advanced gum disease, bone recession and tooth loss are soon to follow.
  • tooth sensitivity. Smoker's teeth hurt with very hot or cold drinks and food.
  • bad breath. The medical term is halitosis, and smoking is one of the big culprits.
  • leukoplakia. These whitish oral lesions on the inside of the cheeks and on gum tissue are common and concerning in the smoker's mouth. They are definitely pre-cancerous.
  • tooth staining. Nice pearly whites get ugly yellow and brown discoloration from cigarettes.
  • oral cancers. The National Institutes of Health state that smoking greatly increases the chance of developing cancer in the mouth. Cigarettes combined with alcohol consumption makes the risk even higher.

Why quitting smoking may be easier now

Yes, quitting the nicotene addiction related to cigarette smoking has always been difficult, but the American Dental Association emphasizes that there are many helps available to smokers these days. One is the extensive network of support groups and one on one coaching. Contact the local branch of the American Cancer Society to find a group or go online to connect with a telephone quit line.

Another available tool is pharmacological support. The primary physician can prescribe nicotene replacement therapy (NRT) in the form of a gum or another drug that he or she thinks can help the individual give up smoking.

Alaska's Trusted Dental supports quitting

Robert Morehead DMD, Max Swenson DMD and Frank Cavaness DDS want you to have your best general and oral health. Their training and experience in a wide range of dental services can help you on your way to a great smile. Also, they assist you with being smoke-free.

Call their friendly staff for a consultation at the Anchorage, Alaska location today. At Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC, 2600 Cordova Street, call 907-276-1712.

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