My Blog

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
November 21, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
DentalMagicTransformsSmiles

Magician Michel Grandinetti can levitate a 500-pound motorcycle, melt into a 7-foot-tall wall of solid steel, and make borrowed rings vanish and reappear baked inside bread. Yet the master illusionist admits to being in awe of the magic that dentists perform when it comes to transforming smiles. In fact, he told an interviewer that it’s “way more important magic than walking through a steel wall because you’re affecting people’s health… people’s confidence, and you’re really allowing people to… feel good about themselves.”

Michael speaks from experience. As a teenager, his own smile was enhanced through orthodontic treatment. Considering the career path he chose for himself — performing for multitudes both live and on TV — he calls wearing an orthodontic device (braces) to align his crooked teeth “life-changing.” He relies on his welcoming, slightly mischievous smile to welcome audiences and make the initial human connection.

A beautiful smile is definitely an asset regardless of whether you’re performing for thousands, passing another individual on a sidewalk or even, research suggests, interviewing for a job. Like Michael, however, some of us need a little help creating ours. If something about your teeth or gums is making you self-conscious and preventing you from smiling as broadly as you could be, we have plenty of solutions up our sleeve. Some of the most popular include:

  • Tooth Whitening. Professional whitening in the dental office achieves faster results than doing it yourself at home, but either approach can noticeably brighten your smile.
  • Bonding. A tooth-colored composite resin can be bonded to a tooth to replace missing tooth structure, such a chip.
  • Veneers. This is a hard, thin shell of tooth-colored material bonded to the front surface of a tooth to change its color, shape, size and/or length; mask dental imperfections like stains, cracks, or chips, and compensating for excessive gum tissue.
  • Crowns. Sometimes too much of a tooth is lost due to decay or trauma to support a veneer. Instead, capping it with a natural-looking porcelain crown can achieve the same types of improvements. A crown covers the entire tooth replacing more of its natural structure than a veneer does.

If you would like more information about ways in which you can transform your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about the techniques mentioned above by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Teeth Whitening,” “Repairing Chipped Teeth,” and “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
November 17, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tooth sensitivity  

If you are one of the many Anchorage, AK residents considering visiting a dentist at Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC for treatment of your sensitive teeth, you are not alone. Tooth sensitivity is an incredibly common dental complaint and it affects millions of American each and  every year. Learn more about this common condition and what you can do to treat it here.

What are Sensitive Teeth?

If you have "sensitive teeth," this means that you experience tooth pain when your teeth come into contact with hold or cold foods or drinks or when your teeth are exposed to cold air. The pain is generally quick and sharp, and it often leads people to avoid eating and drinking foods and beverages that are too hot or too cold altogether.

What Causes Tooth Sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity can be caused by a number of factors, especially when the outer enamel of the tooth is broken or worn away, allowing the tooth's sensitive roots to be exposed. This can happen as the result of a cracked tooth, a loose filling or a poorly performed dental procedure. It can result from excessive tooth whitening, which can wear away at your tooth enamel, or from brushing too vigorously, which can push your gums out of place, exposing your tooth roots. Tooth grinding, gum disease and age can all play a factor as well.

What Treatments are Available for Sensitive Teeth?

While many people choose to simply ignore their tooth sensitivity and avoid foods and beverages that cause it, the good news is that you certainly don't have to live with the pain if you don't want to. Your Anchorage, AK dentist can recommend several easy and effective at-home treatments, including switching to a special toothpaste for sensitive teeth, switching to a softer toothbrush and brushing less vigorously. You can also avoid highly acidic foods and switch to a mouthwash that contains fluoride, as this can help build up your tooth enamel.

If your tooth sensitivity is caused be a dental problem, such as a loose filling, a receding gum line, a cracked tooth or gum disease, your dentist at Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC in Anchorage, AK can treat these as well, restoring your mouth to optimal health once again.

If you notice a sharp pain whenever you eat or drink foods or beverages that are too hot or too cold, you may be suffering from sensitive teeth as well. Try the at-home treatments listed above first, and if they don't help, be sure to call Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC in Anchorage, AK to discuss further treatment options with one of our qualified dentists. Some of the best foods in life are meant to be enjoyed hot or cold--enjoy them!

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
November 06, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Crowns  
Crowns Could be the Smile Solution for Some Unattractive Teeth

While dental implants have become the most popular restoration among both dentists and patients, it’s primarily a tooth replacement — either for a missing tooth or a tooth beyond repair that must be extracted. But what if your tooth is still viable beneath its unattractive exterior? From an oral health standpoint, it’s usually wise to preserve it.

Even so, you still have options for making a tooth that’s spoiling your smile more attractive. One of the most effective solutions happens to be one of the oldest in dentistry: a crown. In effect, a crown is a life-like replica made of metal or dental porcelain that’s bonded over a tooth. And with today’s advanced materials and methods a crown can not only enhance the appearance of the tooth it covers, it can also be made to blend with the color and symmetry of adjacent teeth.

Here are a few dental situations where a crown could provide both protection for a tooth and a more attractive appearance.

Chipped, Damaged or Abnormally Developed Teeth. Teeth often take the brunt of mouth injuries, resulting in chips or even fractures. Also, teeth sometimes don’t erupt fully or develop a normal shape. A crown can effectively cover these missing or abnormal parts of a tooth and restore a more natural appearance.

Following Root Canal Treatment. Trauma or deep decay can damage the interior of a tooth - the pulp and root canals - and endanger its survival. A root canal treatment cleans out and repairs these areas, filling them with a special filling to prevent further infection. A crown is usually necessary to both protect the tooth and restore its appearance.

Discoloration. There’s a difference between outward staining of the enamel, which can usually be brightened with whitening solutions, and staining deep within the tooth from various causes. While there are techniques to bleach “intrinsic” staining, a crown provides another option for covering a heavily discolored tooth for a more attractive appearance.

Excessive Wear. We all experience some teeth wearing as we age; but grinding or clenching habits can accelerate that wear and shorten teeth, resulting in a prematurely aged look. Crowns restore worn teeth to a more normal length that can take “years” off your smile.

If you would like more information on crown restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
October 22, 2015
Category: Oral Health
LamarOdomReboundsFromDentalAnxiety

Professional basketball player Lamar Odom is sometimes known as “the candyman” because of his notorious fondness for sweets. But when his sweet tooth finally caught up with him — in the form of a mouthful of decayed teeth — the six-foot-ten-inch, 230-pound hoops star admitted that he had been avoiding treatment… because he was afraid of going to the dentist!

It took two Kardashians (Khloe and Kim) and a painful toothache to finally persuade Odom to sit in the chair. Once he did, it was found that he needed a root canal, a wisdom tooth extraction, and several fillings. Yet the fretful forward sailed through the whole set of procedures in a single visit, and walked out with a big smile afterward. How did his dentists make that happen?

Put it down to the “magic” of sedation dentistry. With anxiety-relieving medications that can be delivered orally (in pill form or by gas) or intravenously (into the bloodstream), the techniques of sedation dentistry can help even the most fearful patients get the dental care they need. That’s good news for about 50 percent of the population, who admit they’re at least somewhat afraid of the dentist — and even better for the 15 percent who avoid dental care completely due to their fear.

Dentists have a number of ways to ease apprehensive patients through a dental visit. An oral anti-anxiety drug can be given in pill form about an hour beforehand. Nitrous oxide (sometimes called “laughing gas”), which is administered by a mask placed over the mouth or nose, may also be used to relieve anxiety. The calming effects of these medications help make any nervousness melt away — and in many circumstances, mild sedation is all that’s needed to ease the fear.

For lengthier or more complex procedures, intravenous (IV) sedation may be recommended. Unlike deeper (unconscious) sedation, IV sedation doesn’t cause “sleep.” Instead, it puts you in a comfortable semi-awake state, where you can still breathe on your own and respond to stimuli… but without feeling any anxiety. And when the procedure is over, you probably won’t have any memory of it at all.

IV sedation can be administered by dentists who are specially trained and equipped with the proper safety equipment. While sedation is being provided, you will be monitored at all times by a dedicated staff member; when it’s over, you will rest for a while as the medication quickly wears off. Then (as is the case with oral sedation), you’ll need another person to give you a ride home.

Does sedation dentistry really work? Lamar Odom thinks so. “I feel so much better,” he said when his 7-hour procedure was over. “I feel like I accomplished something.”

If you would like more information about sedation dentistry, please contact us or schedule an appointment. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Sedation Dentistry.”

By Anchorage Dental Arts, LLC
October 07, 2015
Category: Oral Health
WhileUsuallyBenignLichenPlanusLesionsShouldStillbeExamined

If you’ve noticed a small sore in your mouth, it’s possible you have a non-contagious disease known as lichen planus. Although usually benign, it’s still a good idea to have it examined and monitored.

The condition is so named because its lesions are similar in appearance to lichen, the algae and fungi organism often found on rocks and trees. It’s believed to be a type of autoimmune disease, in which the body treats some of its own cells as foreign and reacts adversely to them. Certain medications and substances may also cause a lichenoid reaction. Besides the inner cheeks, gums or tongue, lichen planus may also appear on other skin or mucous surfaces on the wrists, legs or fingernails.

When it appears inside the mouth it usually resembles a lacy pattern of white lines or ulceration. Gum tissues may become red and inflamed, with some soreness after brushing or eating. Although there’s no known cure for lichen planus, it rarely causes serious problems — in fact, you may not even be aware you have the condition unless pointed out during a dental exam. It may, in time, fade away.

If the lesions do become bothersome (painful, itchy or overly-sensitive), there are some ways to ease discomfort: brushing with a soft toothbrush (to minimize irritation), flossing, and avoiding acidic or spicy foods and beverages which have been known to cause flare-ups. Managing stress is also helpful, and a topical steroid may be prescribed for more severe outbreaks.

Perhaps the greatest concern with lichen planus, though, is it may resemble more serious conditions, particularly oral cancer. The only way to be certain that it is a benign condition is to perform a biopsy on some of the affected tissue. If you notice a problem, be sure to visit us for a complete examination. And regardless of whether you have the condition or not, regular oral cancer screenings, as well as limits on alcohol consumption and stopping use of tobacco, will also reduce your risk of oral cancer.

Odds are if you have a case of lichen planus it isn’t causing you any problems. If it does cause you discomfort, though, you can take steps to ease your symptoms.

If you would like more information on lichen planus and similar oral conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.





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